Romo Chiropractic Blog

Posts for tag: back

March 24, 2014
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: leg   back   spine   lumbar   muscles   radicula   chiropractic ligament  

Radicular pain, or radiating pain, is caused by interference or pinching of the spinal nerves. This results in pain, tingling, or numbness in parts of your body far from the actual source of the problem.

If your spine is injured, there are a number of things that can affect the nerves and cause pain.

Injured ligaments and muscles can cause inflammation of the nerve root, which can disrupt the function of the nerve. If a spinal disk is damaged, it can cause the disk to bulge or herniate, pinching the nerve. And if the spinal joints begin to calcify, it can cause spinal stenosis, or a narrowing of the canal that the spinal nerves pass through.

All this can lead to a number of conditions such as sciatica, carpal tunnel syndrome, low-back pain, shoulder pain, and more. It’s crucial to treat these conditions to prevent further nerve damage or worsening symptoms.

The key to treating radicular pain is to pinpoint its source in the spine. After determining the root of your pain, a chiropractor can relieve pressure on the impinged nerves. This allows the nerves to heal by reducing inflammation and irritation.

Multiple studies have confirmed the efficacy of chiropractic adjustments in alleviating radicular pain. If you’re looking for a natural, effective pain relief, chiropractic could help.

References

Christensen KD, Buswell K. Chiropractic outcomes managing radiculopathy in a hospital setting: a retrospective review of 162 patients. Journal of Chiropractic Medicine 2008; 7(3):115-25.

Orlin JR, Didriksen A. Results of chiropractic treatment of lumbopelvic fixation in 44 patients admitted to an orthopedic department. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics 2007;30:135-139.

Rodine RJ, Vernon H. Cervical radiculopathy: a systematic review on treatment by spinal manipulation and measurement with the Neck Disability Index. Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association 2012; 56(1):18-28.

By Romo Chiropractic | Modesto Chiropractor
July 10, 2012
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Chiropractic   Chiropractor   CA   modesto   hip   leg   back   spine   pelvis   sacroiliac joints  

The boomerang-shaped sacroiliac joints are found just below the waist on either side of the spine. These joints connect the two pelvic (iliac) bones, and are surrounded by a complex set of ligaments that allow them to move freely, and which support the joints themselves. The purpose of these joints is to transmit forces from the upper body to the lower legs.

The sacroiliac joints can become sprained or inflamed, as the result of injury or trauma (such as from falls or auto accidents), or due to repetitive micro-trauma (such as prolonged bending or lifting), which causes strain to the surrounding muscles and ligaments, and over time can produce microscopic tears and scar tissue. Pregnant women are often at risk for this condition, because the hormones released to increase the laxity of the pelvic muscles can leave them more vulnerable to injury. When this occurs, the resulting condition is called sacroiliac joint dysfunction. The body reacts to the pain of this condition by causing the muscles in the area to tighten up even further, resulting in muscle spasms and even more pain.

Symptoms of sacroiliac joint dysfunction include pain on one or both sides of the pelvis, often radiating to the buttocks and upper legs. The pain is often perceived as better after walking for some time, and worse after sitting or performing activities that involve bending over. Unlike many other lower back conditions, there is rarely a feeling of numbness, "pins and needles," or loss of strength. The pain often seems to recede when lying down, but interestingly enough should not be treated with complete "bed rest," because that will cause the affected ligaments to slacken and become even more weakened from disuse.

Your best option if you have been diagnosed with sacroiliac joint dysfunction or experience a number of the symptoms above is to see your chiropractor. Chiropractic care has been found to be of great benefit, both in terms of relieving immediate pain and also strengthening the muscles and ligaments that cause the condition itself.

The goal of chiropractic care when treating this disorder is to restore a normal balance between the sacrum and the iliac, and to strengthen the muscles that support the sacroiliac joints. Your chiropractor may prescribe a course of spinal adjustments to reposition the joint to its optimal position. This initial phase of the treatment continues until the pain subsides, and is often accompanied by soft tissue massage, ultrasound or electro-stimulation (to relax the tightened muscles and ligaments), or laser therapy. During and after this initial phase of the treatment, your chiropractor may recommend a period of "active rest," meaning alternating periods of rest with beneficial activities such as walking. Gentle exercises may be prescribed, which you can do at home to speed up the healing process and strengthen the affected muscles.

The pain of sacroiliac joint dysfunction can be relieved, and by removing the structural causes of the imbalance through spinal adjustments and other therapies aimed at relaxing the tightened, strained muscles and restoring their proper flexibility and mobility, within a short time you can return to a normal state of health. 

By Romo Chiropractic
July 20, 2011
Category: Decompression

The New Way to Treat Herniated Discs Without Surgery

By Dr. James D. Edwards

If you’re suffering from a herniated disc and chiropractic adjustmentsor therapy have not yielded sufficient benefit, you should ask your doctor if you might be a candidate for spinal decompression therapy.

Spinal Decompression

What is spinal decompression therapy?

It’s a nonsurgical, traction-based treatment for herniated or bulging discs in the neck and low back. Anyone who has back, neck, arm or leg pain caused by a degenerated or damaged disc may be helped by spinal decompression therapy.

Specific conditions that may be helped by this therapeutic procedure include herniated or bulging discs, spinal stenosis, sciatica, facet syndrome, spondylosis or even failed spinal surgery.

Many patients, some with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-documented disc herniations, have achieved “good” to “excellent” results after spinal decompression therapy.

The computerized traction head on the decompression table or machine is the key to the therapy’s effectiveness. The preprogrammed patterns for ramping up and down the amount of axial distraction eliminate muscle guarding and permit decompression to occur at the disc level. This creates a negative pressure within the disc, allowing the protruded or herniated portion to be pulled back within the normal confines of the disc, which permits healing to occur.

Your specific treatment plan will be determined by the doctor after your examination. Based on research and my clinical experience, the best results are achieved with 20 sessions over a six-week period. To reduce inflammation and assist the healing process, supporting structures sometimes are treated with passive therapies (ice/heat/muscle stimulation), chiropractic adjustments (when indicated) and/or active rehabilitation in order to strengthen the spinal musculature.

There are many spinal decompression systems in use today, most of which work equally well. The cost for 20 sessions can range from $1,000 to $5,000 or more. While this may seem like a lot, it is very reasonable, considering the cost and potential adverse outcomes associated with spine surgery.

Spinal decompression therapy has saved many people from spinal surgery. If you are suffering from a degenerated or herniated disc, I encourage you to explore safe and effective spinal decompression therapy before risking surgery. The rationale for treating a herniated disc without resorting to surgery has research support on its side: According to a recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association,surgery is no more effective than non-invasive treatments, including chiropractic care, for patients with lumbar disc herniation causing sciatica.

Ask your doctor for more information about spinal decompression and if you might be a candidate. If your doctor does not yet offer spinal decompression therapy, they can help refer you to someone who does.


What Does It Mean?

Not familiar with some of the terminology in this article? Don’t worry: Here’s a brief explanation of what these terms mean in relation to your spine.

Anulus Fibrosus: The tough outer ring of a vertebral disc; it encases the nucleus pulposus (see description below) within the disc.

Facet Syndrome: An irritation of one or more of the joints on the back of the spinal vertebrae, which comprise the spinal column.

Herniated Disc: Displacement of the center of a vertebral disc through a crack in the outer layer. Disc herniation can put pressure on spinal nerves and cause pain.

Muscle Guarding: Muscle spasming, often in response to a painful stimulus.

Nucleus Pulposus: A gel-like substance within each intervertebral disc, surrounded by the anulus fibrosus.

Sciatica: Pain in the lower back, buttocks, hips, or adjacent anatomical structures, frequently attributable to spinal dysfunction.

Spinal Stenosis: Narrowing of the spine at one or more of three locations: in the center of the spine, where nerves branch from the spine, or in the space between vertebrae. This puts pressure on spinal nerves and can cause pain.

Spondylosis: Otherwise known as spinal arthritis, spondylosis is a degenerative condition in which spinal discs weaken, particularly with age.


James D. Edwards, DC, a graduate of Logan College of Chiropractic in St. Louis, Mo, has been in practice for more than 30 years.